I’m In The Book

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There are several biographies and books of the Grateful Dead on the market. Maybe too many since there are easily over twenty as of 2015.
The latest is
“So Many Roads: The Life and Times of the Grateful Dead”
(released Apr 28, 2015)
by David Browne

My name appears in some of the older books as being in some of Jerry’s Palo Alto era bands but in this one I got a bona fide contributor’s mention.

Mr. Browne had seen my “Reflections On The Garcia” and based on that, contacted me by email a few months ago and asked for a phone interview. We arranged a time and if I remember correctly, we talked for about a little over an hour.

I saw that it had come out and ordered a copy and, Voila!, there I am, my memories referenced accurately and my last name was even spelled right. (In the book he used a lower case “v” on the Van Maastricht but he is forgiven. That error was my fault.)

I’m quoted in roughly four pages. Not much in a book 443 pages long but my contribution represented impressions in such a brief period of the Garcia history.

Still, it is a mildly surreal feeling to see oneself quoted in a hardcover book even unto being listed in the index.

It’s funny… everyone wants to be remembered after they’re gone and in this way I, in a very miniscule way, am now in American music’s memory.

Mr. Browne wrote for, among other things, Rolling Stone magazine so his prose is an easy read. I don’t know if it will be a best seller. I doubt it but I do know those people who are fixated on Garcia and the Grateful Dead will have this in their collections and archives and, for a long time, those who take this book up will read my name and commentary long after I am just a dust bunny.

It’s hard to define what Jerry was to me. To me, he was a real friend, a guy I jammed with a lot, played in little pickup groups that were never paid but always thoroughly enjoyed. He helped me lose some of my fifties Midwestern uptightness. This was not an easy task because it was deeply ingrained. He was instrumental in opening me to areas and ideas in music I hadn’t seen before. Reading the chapter featuring my quotes brought back a flood of memories of people and places and remind me of how really far I have come as a person largely due to Jerry and the people I met during that period.

After he became “famous” we would meet from time to time and would mutually and wordlessly crinkle with a look that said “I can’t hardly believe it either.”

I was immensely proud for him that he became famous and made a living on his music. Every musician has this dream whether they admit it or not. However, such fame comes with a price and for some the price is terrible indeed.
I knew him when he was dirt poor but determined to make music his life. I relished his fame and fortune but was deeply saddened by his entanglements with the demons that eventually killed him

I miss him terribly…

Tom Webb teaches me how to play “Blackberry Blossom”

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I mentioned a band “Shagbark Hickory” in “How to Train a Sound Tech.” Here’s another “Shagbark” story…

When I sat in with them they played a bluegrass standard “Blackberry Blossom.” Onstage communication was the best I’d ever worked with.

However, when “Blackberry Blossom” would come up I would opt out because I hadn’t worked out a solo for it yet. It’s a complex sounding song but is based on a simple descending scale.

Their pedal steel player, Tom Webb and I, liked to needle each other a bit and one night, as Florie started the song Tom leaned back and said, “You gonna play it tonight?”
“Naw, I don’t think so.” I said.
Tom leaned back again and with a twinkle and a grin said, “Jerry DOUGLAS can play it!”

That did it!

So when Florie made eye contact asking if I wanted in, I dove into the tune and, if I say so myself, pulled it off quite handily. I still play pretty much the same break when called on to do that song and think of those guys every time I play it…

To this day I still haven’t had the opportunity to hear the Jerry Douglas version.

How To Train a Sound Tech

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This is one of my favorite “war stories” from my days of playing in public.

I wasn’t working at Barney Steel’s yet. I still worked for Gelb Music at the time but I was a steady habitué of the place.

There was a pretty hot modern country/folk group called “Shagbark Hickory” that I became sort of kissing cousin to. This was because their waist-length-haired fiddler, Florie, was in desperate need of a string replacement mid-gig one night and I saved her bacon by making a nocturnal sale at Gelb Music being as how I had keys to the place. Because of this they liked me a lot and often they would let me sit in with them on Dobro for two or more sets.

Once they got a booking at this really nice, brand new, state-of-the-art venue. Great ambiance, good seating, really nice stage, good monitors, great sound system, individual mics
…and a clueless sound guy.

Every time it came for my solo, even with Florie, the fiddler frantically pointing at me, the guy wouldn’t bring me up in the sound system until I was a measure and a half into my solo.

On break I looked the guy up. I stand 6’2″ and look like my avatar…black hat, beard and long hair and back then I was around 200 pounds. I told the guy “If you cut the front off one more of my solos I promise you I will put my guitar down and will FIND you!!”

End of problem. We played (and sounded) like a well mastered CD the rest of the night.

La Grange

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Rumor spreadin’ a-’round in that Texas town
’bout that shack outside La Grange
(and you know what I’m talkin’ about.)

Just let me know if you wanna go
to that home out on the range.
They gotta lotta nice girls.
Have mercy.
A haw, haw, haw, haw, a haw.
A haw, haw, haw.

What in the world does a song by ZZ Top about a bawdy house in a little town in Texas have to do with one of the best known music stores in the country?

Well it goes like this…

Gelb Music was started by one Sidney Gelb back in 1939. He actually called it Gelb Music Studios because in his day the Hawaiian guitar had the country in thrall and his store made its foundational income on students harvested by door to door salesmen sent forth by the “United Institute of Music” in San Mateo. Sid had a working deal with those folks and did a nice, steady business teaching youngsters first Hawaiian, then later, Spanish guitar in a classroom setting as well as individual lessons at his store/studio. Along the way he would sell or rent the required instruments as the kids needed them.

His business prospered then went into a slight decline. Sidney was feeling his age and wanted to retire. He had no heirs and might have just closed the place or sold it to strangers had it not been for two of his ace guitar teachers, Kevin Jarvis and Henry White.

It was Kevin’s idea to buy the place and bring it up to date. Henry caught on to the idea and set aside his career plan to teach history and, starting in 1972, the two men made history in their own way.

Gone were the group lessons. They still had guitar lessons there but single lessons only. The two young men overhauled the inventory broadening its scope. Soon their new attitude about music and guitaring started to gain notice. There was a Fender franchise that came with the store and along with a ne’er do well of a certain charm, Norm Van Maastricht. Kevin and Henry had their own high levels of musical skill on guitar and Norm was a country/finger style specialist which meant the store was conversant in rock, jazz, country, even banjo and Dobro.

So what did that have to do with ZZ Top and La Grange? Be patient… it’s coming.

Kevin adopted a puppy, a marvelously intelligent Shepherd /Lab named Jessica (named after an Allman Brothers song). The three men shared training of her to be a perfect Store Dog. She became a legend in her own time and there are some who have a hard time talking about her without choking up, so loved was she.

Three young men, knowledgeable about guitaring and a Wonder Dog in the making. We have close to perfection here.

In the foggy mists of memory not much is remembered about what they may have used for background music in the place but that changed one auspicious day.

A guy came into the store looking for a new Martin D-28. One of the more expensive models Martin makes. A state of the art dreadnought size acoustic guitar that was and is world famous.

The store had the guitar but the guy had no money. What he did have was a Very Good Stereo System with a superb turntable. The turntable was a bit of a prima donna, very sensitive to being jarred. The least little bump would send the needle hopping rudely so staff and customers had to be sure to avoid offending it in any way.

But its sound and power was awesome. The swap was made, everybody was delighted with the barter.

Over the years that turntable played just about every recorded guitarist available on 33rpm vinyl. From Django Rheinhardt to Segovia and Bream. Herb Ellis, Lenny Breau, Chet, all the rockers of The Day and everyone in between. They all took a turn on that machine.

One fateful morning soon after acquiring the new stereo setup Kevin put on La Grange.
And cranked it.
The raw power and humor of ZZ Top playing that tune just hit a chord (pun intended) with the store crew.

It became the opening song, the ritual paean that was further nuanced by careful manipulation of the volume knob because in the studio the engineers faded Billy Gibbons exiting solo. Kevin and Henry liked to keep it as loud as the main body of the song as long as they could.

The block was never the same as we three opened the doors and La Grange let the world know Gelb Music was ready for business.

The turntable was so touchy it was enthroned on a cabinet with a carpeted top. People kept bumping into it anyway!. Norm came up with the idea of getting hold of a decal that said Danger, High Voltage and putting it on the top face of the cabinet tucking a wire under that carpet top with about two inches of it stripped and bare. It didn’t stop the bumping altogether but the natural human fear of electrical shock went a long way to reducing the clumsy collisions…

Gelb Music thrived for many years. Over time, Henry and Norm went their separate ways, Henry eventually succumbing to cancer in 2014.

Kevin kept the store and made it into the well known entity it is today. The turntable got moved to safer quarters and the La Grange ritual ceased being a daily thing.

All things, even good things, must come to an end and Kevin decided to retire after the long tour at the end of 2014. He sold the store to a kindred soul, the man who owns Haight Ashbury Music. He decided to keep the name on the business so the name Gelb Music is will continue to assist musicians of the area as it has for so very long.

Today Kevin sent this writer an email which said, in part:

La Grange, became, in the last decades, the annual Saturday before Christmas opening anthem, 42 years and running. The legacy of you, Henry, Trini, Dick, continued on. Every year without fail La Grange played on, and the song still sounds awesome which is totally amazing in and of itself.

Yesterday, (12/20/14) the staff totally aware, all gathered for the final playing at 10:20. Adam even came down for its final performance. Thinking of Henry now gone, those Saturdays in the beginnings all the way to this moment…….our friendship, and all the years gone by in my tour of duty as “Mr. Gelb”, very reflective moment…….what a song, what memories.
It ain’t over until Billy Gibbon’s growls, they got lotta nice girls out there!

_____________

This blog has other Gelb Music stories. Do a search for Tiger Tiger or The Lunch Break or Once Upon A Time or Jessica Dog

A musical interlude~ ‘Last Thing On My Mind’

I hate recording because it is never what I want it to be.  So damn many clams!  It’s because I don’t practice enough.

Having said that, I have friends that want to hear what I do with my spare time besides have demented fantasies filled with beautiful women and Ben and Jerry’s ice cream…

This is an old song from the sixties by Tom Paxton, I think, called “Last Thing On My Mind“.  

First time I ever heard it was by way of Doc Watson.  I looked up the lyrics about a year ago…I don’t always hear lyrics perfectly when sung, you know… and was struck by the poignancy of the refrain…

I should have loved you better

Didn’t mean to be unkind

You know that was the last thing on my mind…”

It puts me in mind of a certain lovely girl I knew, all too briefly, a long time ago.  I certainly didn’t mistreat her but I should have treated her better…

                        didn’t mean to be unkind…

                                                          that was the last thing on my mind…

I think we all have past loves that fit that train of thought…

So here’s the song, warts and all…

All mistakes are intentional….

No real musicians were harmed in the creation of this noisemaker.  Band In a Box was used with the exception of the soloist. 

We try to keep him chained up in the yard but he keeps gnawing his leg off and escaping…

last-thing

photo by http://www.sewellphotos.com/